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 Fighting Alcohol Abuse

Fighting Alcohol Abuse

University of sydney

We were commissioned by the University of Sydney and the Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Council (ADAC) to design a digital solution to inform government policy around alcohol and drug abuse in Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander communities. We challenged existing data collection methodologies and looked at the efficacy that an app solution could provide.
 Fighting Alcohol Abuse
 Fighting Alcohol Abuse

WE CREATED AN APP THAT RESPECTED CULTURAL SENSITIVITIES AROUND LANGUAGE, LITERACY AND NUMERACY. PUTTING USERS CENTRAL TO THE EXPERIENCE WAS KEY. 

The team recognised that empathy and a human-centred design approach was the key to remedying the short-comings of the government’s former data collection process. The Grog Survey App is entirely focused on the user’s context and experiences, combining cultural sensitivities so design components such as illustration and its tailored colour palette resonate with end users. So too, the concept of self-reporting and information confidentiality were both crucial to building trust especially if behavioural change was to be achieved.
 Fighting Alcohol Abuse
 Fighting Alcohol Abuse

THE GROG SURVEY APP WAS A HIGHLY COLLABORATIVE PROJECT INVOLVING A REFINED TEAM OF ACADEMIA, FRONT LINE SERVICES AND FUTURE END USERS.

All stakeholders including the Aboriginal community contributed to understanding and defining the App’s user experience in addition to the wireframing and the visual portrayal of Aboriginal people. The Grog Survey App can be used with affected communities, and with no internet connection, data can still be collected and synched later – a common situation for end users. Importantly, progress is trackable enabling researchers to manage data quality throughout the process. The data generated from the app will replace data collected in the 1994 National Drug Strategy Household Survey.

“This project could transform the way that this type of data is collected in national health surveys. I think our learnings from this project will prompt us to rethink the way we communicate about alcohol.”

Kate Conigrave,
Conjoint Professor, University of Sydney.